In Memory of W B Yeats

The death of the  poet was kept from his poems.
—Auden
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Down by the Salley Gardens

Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet;

She passed the salley gardens with little snow-white feet.

She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree;

But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.

In a field by the river my love and I did stand,

And on my leaning shoulder she laid her snow-white hand.

She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs;

But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears.

✥❆✥❆✥❆✥❆✥

Published in: on June 8, 2010 at 11:26 AM  Leave a Comment  
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Literature adds to reality, it does not simply describe it. It enriches the necessary competencies that daily life requires and provides; and in this respect, it irrigates the deserts that our lives have already become.

—C.S. Lewis

✥❆✥❆✥❆✥❆✥

Published in: on April 27, 2010 at 8:22 PM  Leave a Comment  
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There are only two things we should fight for. One is the defense of our homes and the other is the Bill of Rights.

—Smedley Butler, MajGen, USMC

Published in: on March 15, 2010 at 8:20 PM  Leave a Comment  
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It’s not that I don’t accept God, you must understand; it’s the world created by Him I don’t and cannot accept.

—Dostoevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Published in: on March 10, 2010 at 9:14 AM  Leave a Comment  
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There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.

—Hemingway

Published in: on March 6, 2010 at 10:59 AM  Leave a Comment  
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A political war is one in which everyone shoots from the lip.
—Raymond Moley
Published in: on March 3, 2010 at 6:12 PM  Leave a Comment  
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War, like any other racket, pays high dividends to the very few. . . . The cost of operations is always transferred to the people who do not profit.

—General Smedley Butler

Published in: on March 2, 2010 at 4:13 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Good minds discuss ideas,
mediocre minds discuss things,
and poor minds discuss each other.
Published in: on March 1, 2010 at 6:26 PM  Leave a Comment  
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The strongest words are often used in the weakest arguments.
Published in: on February 28, 2010 at 8:37 AM  Leave a Comment  
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While we are postponing, life speeds by.  —Seneca

Published in: on February 23, 2010 at 8:02 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Life is pleasant. Death is peaceful. It’s the transition that’s troublesome.

—Isaac Asimov

Published in: on February 23, 2010 at 7:16 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Death is that after which nothing is of interest.  —Rozinov
Published in: on February 23, 2010 at 5:20 PM  Leave a Comment  
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A stupid man’s report of what a clever man says is never accurate because he unconsciously translates what he hears into something he can understand.
—Bertrand Russell
Published in: on February 22, 2010 at 10:31 PM  Leave a Comment  
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The biblical account of Noah’s Ark and the Flood is perhaps the most implausible story for fundamentalists to defend. Where, for example, while loading his ark, did Noah find penguins and polar bears in Palestine?

Published in: on February 21, 2010 at 7:50 PM  Leave a Comment  
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One of the maxims I’ve always tried to adhere to is that every scene in every book should always accomplish at least two things. The first is to allow the reader a window into whatever is happening on the surface, the “Now.”  The second is to allow the reader to either get a glimpse into the future, or the past. The “Then.”         —Jason Pinter

Published in: on February 21, 2010 at 9:58 AM  Leave a Comment  
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A beautiful and ineffectual angel, beating in the void his luminous wings in vain.

—Matthew Arnold on Percy Bysshe Shelley

Published in: on February 19, 2010 at 3:37 PM  Leave a Comment  
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An artist never really finishes his work; he merely abandons it. —Paul Valery
Published in: on February 17, 2010 at 2:58 PM  Leave a Comment  
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A million years from now the earth may be filled with creatures who stoutly deny that they ever descended from man.
Published in: on February 16, 2010 at 4:12 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Fiddle, n.:  An instrument to tickle human ears by friction of a horse’s tail on the entrails of a cat.
—Ambrose Bierce
The Devil’s Dictionary
Published in: on February 15, 2010 at 11:11 AM  Leave a Comment  
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A healthy hypochondriac in a cancer ward can cause a lot of resentment.
Published in: on February 13, 2010 at 10:27 PM  Leave a Comment  
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All those who oppose the plan I am about to present will signify by saying “I resign.”
Published in: on February 11, 2010 at 3:14 PM  Leave a Comment  
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There is only one honest impulse at the bottom of Puritanism, and that is the impulse to punish the man with a superior capacity for happiness.
—H L Mencken
Published in: on January 15, 2010 at 2:25 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Be slow of tongue and quick of eye.

—Miguel de Cervantes

Published in: on January 12, 2010 at 3:30 PM  Leave a Comment  
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The Artist

A man who works with his hands is a laborer. A man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman. But a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist.

—G A Stewart
Published in: on January 8, 2010 at 4:02 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Useful Falsehood?

Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by rulers as useful.

—Seneca

~~~~~~~~~~~❖❖❖❖~~~~~~~~~~~

Published in: on January 6, 2010 at 8:04 AM  Leave a Comment  
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The Dangers of Dawn

Dawn, n.: The time when men of reason go to bed. Certain old men prefer to rise at about that time, taking a cold bath and a long walk with an empty stomach, and otherwise mortifying the flesh. They then point with pride to these practices as the cause of their sturdy health and ripe years; the truth being that they are hearty and old, not because of their habits, but in spite of them. The reason we find only robust persons doing this thing is that it has killed all the others who have tried it.

—Ambrose Bierce
The Devil’s Dictionary

Published in: on January 2, 2010 at 11:42 AM  Leave a Comment  
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The book, the viol, the violet and the vine

Age appears best in four things:
old wood to burn,
old wine to drink,
old friends to trust,
and old authors to read.

—Francis Bacon


~~~~~~~~~~~❖❖❖❖~~~~~~~~~~~

Published in: on January 1, 2010 at 2:50 PM  Comments (2)  
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Of Life And The River

If the life of a river depended only on the rainfall within the confines of its own banks, it would soon be dry. If the life of an individual depended solely on his own resources, he would soon fall. Be grateful for your tributaries.

—Dr. William Arthur Ward

Published in: on December 29, 2009 at 1:43 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Into that good night

In 1845 Heine first showed the symptoms of the crippling spinal disease that condemned him to a “mattress grave” for many years before his end. He viewed the approach of death calmly, refusing to be drawn into a display of religious zeal. “God will pardon me,” he said. “It’s his profession.” It was with less equanimity, however, that he viewed the possibility of leaving things unsaid. His last words were, “Write … write … pencil … paper.”

Published in: on December 24, 2009 at 8:06 AM  Leave a Comment  
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The Bore

He is an old bore; even the grave yawns for him.

—Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree

He’s the kind of bore who’s here today and here tomorrow.

—Binnie Barnes

A bore is a person who talks when you want him to listen.

—Ambrose Bierce

Published in: on December 20, 2009 at 10:18 AM  Leave a Comment  
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East vs West

The most outstanding characteristic of Eastern civilization is to know contentment, whereas that of Western civilization is not to know contentment.

—Hu Shih

Published in: on December 19, 2009 at 9:34 AM  Leave a Comment  
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Civilization’s Shadow

Is civilization progress? The challenge, I think, is clear; and, as clearly, the final answer will be given not by our amassing of knowledge, or by the discoveries of our science, or by the speed of our aircraft, but by the effect our civilized activities as a whole have upon the quality of our planet’s life—the life of plants and animals as well as that of men.

—Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr.

Published in: on December 18, 2009 at 10:56 AM  Leave a Comment  
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To have read the greatest works of any great poet, to have beheld or heard the greatest works of any great painter or musician, is a possession added to the best things of life.

—Algernon Charles Swinburne

Published in: on December 17, 2009 at 1:47 PM  Leave a Comment  
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In the creative state a man is taken out of himself. He lets down as it were a bucket into his subconscious, and draws up something which is normally beyond his reach. He mixes this thing with his normal experiences, and out of the mixture he makes a work of art.

—E M Forster

Published in: on December 15, 2009 at 9:53 AM  Leave a Comment  
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Lovely Organs

I’m tired of all this nonsense about beauty being only skin-deep. That’s deep enough. What do you want—an adorable pancreas?

—Jean Kerr

Published in: on December 15, 2009 at 9:43 AM  Leave a Comment  
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And I Quote. . . .

A writer expresses himself in words that have been used before because they give his meaning better than he can give it himself, or because they are beautiful or witty, or because he expects them to touch a chord of association in his reader, or because he wishes to show that he is learned and well read. Quotations due to the last motive are invariably ill-advised; the discerning reader detects it and is contemptuous; the undiscerning is perhaps impressed, but even then is at the same time repelled, pretentious quotations being the surest road to tedium.

—Francis George Fowler

Published in: on December 12, 2009 at 11:11 PM  Leave a Comment  
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A Little Goethe

One ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read

a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible,

to speak a few reasonable words.

—Goethe

Published in: on December 12, 2009 at 1:52 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Writers on Writing

Someday I hope to write a book where the royalties will pay for the copies I give away.

—Clarence Darrow

Published in: on December 11, 2009 at 2:16 PM  Leave a Comment  
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Sorrow Enough

If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we

should find in each man’s life sorrow and suffering enough

to disarm all hostility.

—Longfellow

Published in: on December 11, 2009 at 12:23 PM  Leave a Comment  
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